Medical Symptoms Possibly Confused as Vampirism

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Absolutely NO part of this article has been changed from it’s original creation (except where specified).

Symptoms that may be confused as [real] Vampirism

SYMPTOMS CHECKLIST FOR OTHER DISEASES:

“Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.” ~Carl Sagan

Vampirism is an extraordinary condition. The symptoms that one has when affected by it are rather extraordinary to find together. When you are a vampire and you go through your awakening the symptoms can be sometimes rather severe, and seem to be other illnesses. However those illnesses have a different set of symptoms than the ones that will be present, and if you are properly tested for this illnesses, you will come out negative.

Conversely, there are a few diseases out there that have symptoms that are easily confused for the symptoms of vampirism. Here are a few of them, and I’ll be adding more ailments as well as their symptoms later:

Dehydration

Symptoms of Dehydration

  • Dry mouth
  • Dry tongue
  • Fatigue
  • Dark colored urine
  • Infrequent urination
  • Reduced urine
  • Dry skin
  • Loose skin
  • Wrinkled skin
  • Rapid pulse
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle cramps
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sunken eyes
  • Light-headedness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of consciousness
  • From Wrong Diagnosis.

 

Rickets

Signs and symptoms of rickets include:

  • Bone pain or tenderness
  • dental problems
  • muscle weakness (rickety myopathy or “floppy baby syndrome”)
  • increased tendency for fractures (easily broken bones), especially greenstick fractures
  • Skeletal deformity
  • Cranial, spinal, and pelvic deformities
  • Growth disturbance
  • Hypocalcaemia (low level of calcium in the blood), and
  • Tetany (uncontrolled muscle spasms all over the body).
  • Craniotabes (soft skull)
  • Costochondral swelling (aka “rickety rosary” or “rachitic rosary”)
  • Harrison’s groove
  • Double malleoli sign due to metaphyseal hyperplasia [1] An X-ray or radiograph of an advanced sufferer from rickets tends to present in a classic way: bow legs (outward curve of long bone of the legs) and a deformed chest. Changes in the skull also occur causing a distinctive “square headed” appearance. These deformities persist into adult life if not treated.
  • Long-term consequences include permanent bends or disfiguration of the long bones, and a curved back.

Iron Deficiency Anemia

Mild iron deficiency anemia may not cause noticeable symptoms. If anemia is severe, symptoms may include:

  • Weakness, fatigue, or lack of stamina.
  • Shortness of breath during exercise.
  • Headache.
  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Irritability.
  • Dizziness.
  • Pale skin.
  • Craving substances that are not food (pica). In particular, a craving for ice can be a sign of iron deficiency anemia.
  • Other signs may include:
    • Rapid heartbeat.
    • Brittle fingernails and toenails.
    • Cracked lips.
    • Smooth, sore tongue.

From WebMD.

Lead poisoning

The signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in children are nonspecific and may include:

  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Sluggishness
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Unusual pallor (paleness) from anemia
  • Learning difficulties
  • Signs and symptoms in adultsAlthough children are primarily at risk, lead poisoning is also dangerous to adults. Signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in adults may include:
    • Pain, numbness or tingling of the extremities
    • Muscular weakness
    • Headache
    • Abdominal pain
    • Memory loss
    • Mood disorders
    • Reduced sperm count, abnormal spermAlso, lead poisoning can lead to pika*, the urge to eat inedible or unusual objects, such as more lead paint chips, or perhaps blood.
  • Taken from MayoClinic.com.*not taken from Mayo Clinic
  • Hypoglycemia
  • The first set of symptoms are called neuro-genic (or sympathetic) because they relate to the nervous system�s response to hypoglycemia. Patients may experience any of the following;
    • nervousness,
    • sweating,
    • intense hunger,
    • trembling,
    • weakness,
    • palpitations, and
    • often have trouble speaking.
  • If a person does not or cannot respond by eating something to raise blood glucose, the levels of glucose continue to drop. Somewhere in the 45 mg/dl range, most patients progress to neuro-glyco-penic ranges (the brain is not getting enough glucose). At this point, symptoms progress to confusion, drowsiness, changes in behavior, coma and seizure.
  • From MedicineNet’s Hypoglycemia Information.

Diabetes

  • People who think they might have diabetes must visit a physician for diagnosis. They might have SOME or NONE of the following symptoms:
  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Extreme hunger
  • Sudden vision changes
  • Tingling or numbness in hands or feet
  • Feeling very tired much of the time
  • Very dry skin
  • Sores that are slow to heal
  • More infections than usual.
  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains may accompany some of these symptoms in the abrupt onset of insulin-dependent diabetes, now called type 1 diabetes.
  • From The Centers of Disease Control website.

Lupus

  • Common signs of lupus are:
    • Red rash or color change on the face, often in the shape of a butterfly across the nose and cheeks
    • Painful or swollen joints
    • Unexplained fever
    • Chest pain with deep breathing
    • Swollen glands
    • Extreme fatigue (feeling tired all the time)
    • Unusual hair loss (mainly on the scalp)
    • Pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress
    • Sensitivity to the sun
    • Low blood count
    • Depression, trouble thinking, and/or memory problems
    • Other signs are mouth sores, unexplained seizures (convulsions), �seeing things� (hallucinations), repeated miscarriages, and unexplained kidney problems.
  • From Do I Have Lupus?

Porphyria

  • When heme production is faulty, porphyrins are overproduced and lend a reddish-purple color to urine.
  • The cutaneous porphyrias cause sun sensitivity, with blistering typically on the face, back of the hands, and other sun-exposed areas. The most common of these is porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). Triggering factors are alcohol use, estrogen, iron, and liver disease, particularly hepatitis C.
  • The acute porphyrias typically cause abdominal pain and nausea. Some patients have personality changes and seizures at the outset. With time the illness can involve weakness in many different muscles.
  • Porphyria affects either the nervous system or the skin. When porphyria affects the nervous system, it can cause chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle cramps, weakness, hallucinations, seizures, purple-red-colored urine, or mental disorders like depression, anxiety, and paranoia. When porphyria affects the skin, blisters, itching, swelling, and sensitivity to the sun can result.
  • The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Porphyria includes the 29 symptoms listed below:
    • Urine color changes
    • Darkened urine
    • Nerve complication symptoms
      • Chest pain
      • Abdominal pain
      • Muscle cramps
      • Muscle weakness
      • Hallucinations
      • Seizures
      • Depression
      • Anxiety
      • Paranoia
      • High blood pressure
      • Rapid pulse
      • Fever
    • Skin complication symptoms
      • Skin blisters
      • Skin itching
      • Skin swelling
      • Sun sensitivity
      • Photosensitivity
      • Paresthesias
      • Hair growth abnormalities
      • Skin pigment changes
    • Gastrointestinal upset
      • Abdominal pain
      • Vomiting
      • Nausea
      • Constipation
  • The only way to be sure you have porphyria is through a series of tests that include:
    • Blood tests
    • Urine tests for porphyrins
    • Stool tests for porphyrins
  • From Wrong Diagnosis.

Xeroderma Pigmentosa

    • Symptoms:
    • A sunburn that does not heal following minimal sun exposure
    • Blistering following minimal sun exposure
    • Cutaneous telangiectasia [abnormal dilation of blood vessels near the surface of the skin]
    • Increasing irregular pigmentation of the skin
    • Crusting of the skin
    • Scaling of the skin
    • Oozing raw skin surface
    • Discomfort when exposed to bright light ( photophobia )
    • Neurologic changes are sometimes noted
  • From The University of Maryland Medical Center website.

Bipolar Disorder

  • Signs and symptoms of mania (or a manic episode) include:
    • Increased energy, activity, and restlessness
    • Excessively “high,” overly good, euphoric mood
    • Extreme irritability
    • Racing thoughts and talking very fast, jumping from one idea to another
    • Distractibility, can’t concentrate well
    • Little sleep needed
    • Unrealistic beliefs in one’s abilities and powers
    • Poor judgment
    • Spending sprees
    • A lasting period of behavior that is different from usual
    • Increased sexual drive
    • Abuse of drugs, particularly cocaine, alcohol, and sleeping medications
    • Provocative, intrusive, or aggressive behavior
    • Denial that anything is wrong
  • A manic episode is diagnosed if elevated mood occurs with three or more of the other symptoms most of the day, nearly every day, for 1 week or longer. If the mood is irritable, four additional symptoms must be present.
  • Signs and symptoms of depression (or a depressive episode) include:
    • Lasting sad, anxious, or empty mood
    • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
    • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
    • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed, including sex
    • Decreased energy, a feeling of fatigue or of being “slowed down”
    • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
    • Restlessness or irritability
    • Sleeping too much, or can’t sleep
    • Change in appetite and/or unintended weight loss or gain
    • Chronic pain or other persistent bodily symptoms that are not caused by physical illness or injury
    • Thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts
  • A depressive episode is diagnosed if five or more of these symptoms last most of the day, nearly every day, for a period of 2 weeks or longer.
  • A mild to moderate level of mania is called hypomania. Hypomania may feel good to the person who experiences it and may even be associated with good functioning and enhanced productivity. Thus even when family and friends learn to recognize the mood swings as possible bipolar disorder, the person may deny that anything is wrong. Without proper treatment, however, hypomania can become severe mania in some people or can switch into depression.
  • Sometimes, severe episodes of mania or depression include symptoms of psychosis (or psychotic symptoms). Common psychotic symptoms are hallucinations (hearing, seeing, or otherwise sensing the presence of things not actually there) and delusions (false, strongly held beliefs not influenced by logical reasoning or explained by a person’s usual cultural concepts). Psychotic symptoms in bipolar disorder tend to reflect the extreme mood state at the time. For example, delusions of grandiosity, such as believing one is the President or has special powers or wealth, may occur during mania; delusions of guilt or worthlessness, such as believing that one is ruined and penniless or has committed some terrible crime, may appear during depression. People with bipolar disorder who have these symptoms are sometimes incorrectly diagnosed as having schizophrenia, another severe mental illness.
  • From The National Institute of Mental Health website.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder

  • Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder include:
    • Incorrect interpretation of events, including feeling that external events have personal meaning
    • Peculiar thinking, beliefs or behavior
    • Belief in special powers, such as telepathy
    • Perceptual alterations, in some cases bodily illusions, including “phantom pains” or other distortions in the sense of touch
    • Idiosyncratic speech, such as loose or vague patterns of speaking or tendency to go off on tangents
    • Suspicious or paranoid ideas
    • Flat emotions or inappropriate emotional responses
    • Lack of close friends outside of the immediate family
    • Persistent and excessive social anxiety that doesn’t abate with time
  • Schizotypal personality disorder can easily be confused with schizophrenia, which is characterized by intense psychosis, a severe mental state characterized by a loss of contact with reality. While schizotypal personalities may experience brief psychotic episodes with delusions or hallucinations, they are not as pronounced, frequent or intense as in schizophrenia.
  • Both disorders, along with schizoid personality disorder, belong to what’s generally referred to as the “schizophrenic spectrum.” Schizotypal personality falls in the middle of the spectrum, with schizoid personality disorder on the milder end and schizophrenia on the more severe end.
  • From MayoClinic.com.

And last, but by no means least:

Hypochondria

Symptoms of hypochondria include, but are not limited to:

  • If you think you have most, if not everything listed above.

Links/References:

 

*7/30/15 – minor edits have been made and conditions added by myself, Amelia Nightside

 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) is a condition in which your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough of certain important hormones

It seldom causes symptoms in the early stages, but, over time, untreated hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease. – http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/basics/definition/con-20021179

Symptoms include (but may not be limited to):

  • Fatigue
  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Constipation or IBS related symptoms
  • Acid Reflux
  • Dry, rough pale skin
  • Dry/Brittle fingernails and toenails
  • Unexplained Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
  • Puffy face
  • Hoarseness
  • Muscle weakness
  • Elevated blood cholesterol level
  • Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
  • Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
  • Heavier than normal or irregular menstrual periods
  • Thinning hair
  • Coarse, dry hair
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Depression or mood swings
  • Impaired memory
  • Irritability
  • Swelling of the thyroid gland (goiter)
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

(Some symptoms presented in Infants, Children and Teens may vary as compared to symptoms in adults, please see the following link for more: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/basics/symptoms/con-20021179 )

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Information Covered: O = Otherkin (Unicorns, Draconity, Fictionkin, Objectkin, etc. possibly included), T = Therian, V = Vampirism (Medical Sanguinarians possibly included), D = Donor specific resources (in reference to Vampires & Sanguinarians) + = more/other

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