Very Real Risks to Blood-Drinking

Risks from Human blood consumption
*All sources provided with each snippet/quote. Please notify me if any links are broken

BLOODBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASES: HIV/AIDS,HEPATITIS B, HEPATITIS C

– Exposures to blood and other body fluids occur across a wide variety of occupations. Health care workers, emergency response and public safety personnel, and other workers can be exposed to blood through needlestick and other sharps injuries, mucous membrane, and skin exposures. The pathogens of primary concern are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Workers and employers are urged to take advantage of available engineering controls and work practices to prevent exposure to blood and other body fluids. – http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/

List of Bloodborne Pathogens

Bloodborne illnesses are caused by microscopic pathogens. –

Bloodborne pathogens cause diseases through contact with blood. Since these diseases are present in an infected persons’ blood they are often present in other bodily fluids, so direct contact with blood is not always the only way to transmit them. Some bloodborne pathogens pose few significant health threats and some are potentially fatal, often by leading to other illnesses. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers extensive information about these pathogens.

– Read more: List of Bloodborne Pathogens | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6822351_list-bloodborne-pathogens.html#ixzz1r6vFNEtT

  • Hepatitis B – Hepatitis B attacks the liver. It can cause fatal liver conditions like cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. The CDC estimates that 3,000 people die each year from Hepatitis B related illness in the United States. Hepatitis B is commonly transmitted among drug users through shared needles and can be transmitted through any blood contact that involves a puncture of the skin or mucosal contact with other infectious body fluids.
  • Hepatitis C – The CDC lists Hepatitis C as the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States. Hepatitis C is transmitted most efficiently through direct blood contact involving a skin puncture. Transmission through sex or contact with other bodily fluids is possible but uncommon. As with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C can result in chronic, fatal liver diseases. The CDC estimates that four times as many people die from Hepatitis C related illnesses than from Hepatitis B.
  • HIV – Human immunodeficiency virus causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS weakens the immune system making it difficult for infected persons to resister other illnesses. AIDS is a late stage of the HIV viral infection and HIV medications can stave off the onset of AIDS for years or even decades. HIV is transmitted through unprotected sexual activity but can also be contracted through direct blood contact though skin punctures or to mucus membranes. The CDC recorded over 14,000 HIV related deaths in 2007.
  • Viral Hemorrhagic Fever – Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) refers to a group of illnesses that affect multiple organ systems. Bleeding, or hemorrhaging can be a major symptom of these diseases. The CDC has a Special Pathogens Branch that deals with the most sever VHFs. Insects and rodents are known hosts of VHFs but the hosts of some VHFs are unknown. Ebola and Marburg are two of the most well-known and dangerous VHFs. CDC records of Ebola and Marburg outbreaks indicate that the viruses most commonly occur in a few African countries and are often fatal. VHFs can be transmitted through blood and other bodily fluids but the fluids do not have to enter the skin through a puncture to cause infection.

Animal Blood – Safety of Pig vs. Cow blood (contributed by Orb)

Though the possibility of becoming ill from Pork blood is small, why risk it at all? It has nothing to do with pathogens, but instead with parasites. Trichinosis is a gastrointestinal illness caused by the intestinal roundworm, Trichinella spiralis. Trichinosis is prevented by cooking all pork and pork products at a temperature and for a sufficient amount of time to allow all parts to reach 71° C.

The eggs of this parasite can be found in a certain percentage of all pigs raised for dietary uses … which is why everyone always tells you to be certain to cook pork thoroughly before eating. It can also be found in the blood of the animal. Unfortunately, heating the blood to the suggested 71° C essentially destroys it, as far as it being “fresh” any longer, though you can make a nice blood pudding from it (I hear, I don’t do cooked blood).

In the infective stages, trichinosis causes intestinal ailments, nausea, vomiting, and watery stools. Later symptoms are facial swelling, headache, and delirium. Some people recovering from trichinosis suffer permanent heart or eye damage, and about 5 percent of cases are fatal. Trichinosis may be successfully treated with drugs before the blood migration phase (which is when the parasite eggs enter the blood stream of the host before attaching themselves to muscle fibers and forming cysts), but it is difficult to diagnose in the early stages. This disease is difficult to see in dietary pigs, and therefore a good deal of pork is sold that is infected. If you buy blood from a butcher, your chances of getting infected blood are higher, as it does not come from a major plant with FDA inspectors on site. The inspection system for small butcher shops is significantly different from that of major plants (more lax). Therefore, anytime you purchase ANY meat or blood product from a butcher you take a risk of some sort. Good reason to know your butcher well.

Beef blood is significantly safer as there are very few diseases or parasites that can be exchanged between humans and cows (mad cow disease being the only one I know of really – it being of little consequence here in the US).

Besides, I happen to like the taste of beef blood better than pig anyway.

http://www.drinkdeeplyanddream.com/realvampire/animal-blood.html

Other Risks of Blood-drinking

Besides the obvious (I hope) risk of becoming infected with a Blood-Borne Disease there are other risks involved, both mental and physical, to your and your donor that you definitely should be aware of. Those wishing to be “turned” especially should take note of these two pages.

To get the blood you need there are pretty much only three ways to do so: Cut another human being (donor), via menstruated blood, or via blood from a slaughter house. And the physical risks vary with each as well.

The common factor being there is no way to procure and drink blood that is completely risk-free. What goes for sex applies here to, the only true safety is to abstain. But, that aside, what are the risks behind each one?

Warning! The information below is not pretty nor glamorous, and I would not recommend eating anything while reading. It is, however, the truth which you as drinker, donor, or interested party should very much be aware of.

Click to read more: http://sarasvati.sanguinarius.org/oblbrsk.htm

Risks of blood-consumption and of blood-letting:

– Scarring

– Infection

– Blood loss

– HIV (AIDs)

– Hepatitis B & C

– VHF

– Salmonella or E. Coli (infected/undercooked meat and blood)

– trichinosis

– Brucellosis

– and many more..

 

A friend of mine years ago, “SpikeJonez” left me with this lovely little tale:

..then there were these other fellers. These guys come into the store, one of them kinda barrel-shaped and ruddy, wearing a Confederate flag t-shirt, boots, jacket and cowboy hat, the other being a beetle-like skinny guy with a pockmarked and skeletal face wearing a black trenchcoat and some metal t-shirt and jeans.

They come in and I roll out the patter of all of the things we have in the store, and when I get to “knives” they both practically leapt at the knife counter. I then proceed to demonstrate the various knives, and I’m noticing that they both have a peculiar tic, sort of weaving their heads occasionally and jerking it back into place.

They also had strange movements in other parts of their bodies, which I came to notice, too. I was used to seeing drunks and tweekers come in here and knew what their various drug-induced convulsions looked like, and this wasn’t it. Yet it looked kinda familiar, and I struggled to place it.

As the conversation goes on, I begin to suss out that these fellas think they are vampires, and they keep making thinly-veiled allusions to murdering people.

Now, New Orleans is swamp country, and there’s no better place to dispose of a body than in a gator-filled swamp, so I’d met my fair share of murderers down there. You can just tell the type of guy who could kill without compunction. I could tell that these guys were the type who could never kill a man, but I could also tell that they were the type to kill something.

Soon enough, the conversation moved on to blood, and at this point I just join in, unlike my usual quiet smiles when faced with such conversations. I mentioned that good blood is hard to find. The big guy looks over to the little guy and says “Not if you know where to find it,” and grinned a jack-o’-lantern grin, to which his cohort responded by oinking.

That’s when I realized what the deal was with the twitching. These guys had trichinosis. Yep, little worms were happily burrowing around in their brains driving them slowly insane, all because they drank infected pig’s blood. Hell, for all I know they got it from a rare porkchop at some backwoods roadside barbecue, but I like to think that it was their unsafe feeding habits that got them in the end. Remember kiddies, think before you drink!

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