Alpha, Wolf Packs & Therians

Alpha, Wolf Packs & Therians

Original Copy

Alpha

The first letter in the Greek Alphabet (as I’m sure we all know). Alpha has taken on many connotations over time, from types of social personalities to individuals in canine (and primate) groups. I will discuss here, the context of Alpha in Wolf packs versus Therian groups.

Other keywords to understand: Hierarchy, Dominance Hierarchy, Family/Familial Hierarchy Beta, Omega.

Wolves

Outmoded notion of the alpha wolf

The concept of the alpha wolf is well ingrained in the popular wolf literature at least partly because of my book “The Wolf: Ecology and Behavior of an Endangered Species,” written in 1968, published in 1970, republished in paperback in 1981, and currently still in print, despite my numerous pleas to the publisher to stop publishing it. Although most of the book’s info is still accurate, much is outdated. We have learned more about wolves in the last 40 years then in all of previous history.

One of the outdated pieces of information is the concept of the alpha wolf. “Alpha” implies competing with others and becoming top dog by winning a contest or battle. However, most wolves who lead packs achieved their position simply by mating and producing pups, which then became their pack. In other words they are merely breeders, or parents, and that’s all we call them today, the “breeding male,” “breeding female,” or “male parent,” “female parent,” or the “adult male” or “adult female.” In the rare packs that include more than one breeding animal, the “dominant breeder” can be called that, and any breeding daughter can be called a “subordinate breeder.”

For details, see www.wolf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/267alphastatus_english.pdf and www.wolf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/247Leadership.pdf

Source: http://www.davemech.org/news.html | View the Alpha Wolf video on YouTube

It’s important to understand that while wolves can and do organize themselves in a sort of Dominance Hierarchy, where the Alpha(s) is the highest rank in all ways and reaches said rank through leading, posturing and fighting, this behavior is only seen under special circumstances such as a group of [usually] unrelated individuals (captive bred or captured from the wild) being forced to live together or some other form of human involvement/intervention.

In the wild, it is incredibly rare for Dominance based Hierarchy to form naturally, but when it does it usually involves a large number of wolves (Example: See the Druid Wolf Pack of Yellowstone National Park), with the average pack being only 6-7 individuals, these packs can number 10 to 20 or more.

Large packs can be a good sign regarding the environment, and resources (like food/prey animals). These [super] packs do not last long. Disease spreads faster in large groups, resources run out quickly with more mouths to feed, and excessive infighting can result smaller alliances, and death of those subordinate individuals.

Natural wolf packs, instead, tend to be simply a family group utilizing a simple Family or Familial Hierarchy. In this structure, the head of the group is the breeding pair, or mother and father. The subordinates being their older and younger offspring.

For additional research and helpful information:

Other Common “ranks”

Beta – When applicable, this is often the second in command filled by the eldest offspring, sibling of the alpha or simply the strongest (but not stronger than the alpha) of the group. Behavior and duties include lending aid to the alphas, existing as replacement to the alphas should they die, can’t perform their duties or otherwise turn up MIA (Missing In Action).

Omega – When applicable, The lowest rank. Sometimes a “jokester”, playful adult, and playmate for youngsters. Often the scapegoat and living punching bag to relieve stress and frustration of all other members of the group. Omegas can be/do get bullied to death or run out of the group.

Therians

There are at least two types of social groups for Therians. These are Packs and Howls.

Howls are simply meet-up groups. These individuals gather at regular intervals (weekly, monthly, annually, etc.) for various reasons. Some reasons might include (but not limited to) Discussion of Therianthropy itself, Discussion of the Online/Offline community, Discussion of personal Therianthropy, other fun or serious community-building events… I may get more into detail about Howls another time.

Packs are usually groups of Therians that form for the purpose of socialization and belonging. At it’s core, it’s just a friendship group. Some however take a more serious or professional purpose (more common for older/adult groups), gaining a title and recognized reputation. They might regularly organize Howls, community service, education and/or other events. Others might form for more relaxed and common purposes (more common for 20-and-under crowds) such as roleplaying, going to the mall, not being alone in school, etc. Many of the “fun” or “young” packs are online-only groups, whereas “serious” or “adult” groups might be more likely to have an offline presence as well.

Ranks in Therian Packs are sometimes applied under a bit of ignorance (lack of knowledge) by those who may be attempting to resemble real wolf packs, without an accurate working knowledge of how wolf packs actually operate in the wild. Ranks are otherwise applied with careless intent. Some use them purely for aesthetic appeal (to seem cool), others have expressed or suppressed need to be in-charge, in-power or control others. Some express a desire or need to care for others.

Social order happens naturally. Reasons for using ranks and labels for Therian social groups can be as varied as the individuals themselves, but humans have a need for labels, and so by following the example of other Therian Packs, or a loose understanding of wolf packs (or other animal social groups) many Therian groups apply ranks to their individual members sometimes with roles and duties included, sometimes not.

In Summary and Conclusion

Dominance based hierarchy is not common of natural and wild wolves. Alpha with the connotation of being the biggest, smartest, fastest, the best, the top dog, etc. Does not apply to these packs. Instead, natural and wild wolves breed, and build families. The leaders are purely the mother and father. Subordinates are their offspring.

Cases in which wolves express dominance hierarchy almost always come from those unrelated groups forced together in captivity or other wild groups that have had some other human involvement.

Therian groups are not wolf packs and will likely share a majority of their characteristics (social structure/order) with that of other human social groups and many ill-informed or ignorant might attempt to model their packs after misunderstandings of wolf packs.

Additional Quick Facts

While wolves and domestic dogs are most commonly associated with hierarchy-based group structure, but plenty of other animals utilize such social hierarchical orders (some dominance-ruled others not). Some examples are (but not limited to): Humans, Baboons, Chickens, Hyenas, Meerkats, African wild dogs, Gorillas, orcas. – Pretty much any social species uses some method of organization within their groups, sometimes it is dominance run, other times it’s sex based, and so on.

Wolves usually mate for life.

When a young wolf reaches sexual maturity (adulthood for most animals), 2 years old for females and 3 years old for males, they will leave their natal (birth) pack willingly or be kicked out by their parents to find a single mate and start their own pack (family).

Wolf pups are born with blue eyes. No pureblood adult wolf has blue eyes.

Most black-colored wolves (seen in Grey/Timber and Red wolf subspecies) are likely to be descended from a wolf-dog hybrid.

Wolves only have four toes (and no dew claw) on their back paws.

Wolves don’t howl at the moon, they angle their heads to the sky to give their howl as much distance as possible, to be heard from other wolves (packmates, rival packs, roaming bachelors/bachelorettes, etc.).

Barking/yipping is rare in wolves and only used as a warning.
http://www.wolf.org/wolf-info/basic-wolf-info/biology-and-behavior/communication/

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Very Real Risks to Blood-Drinking

Risks from Human blood consumption
*All sources provided with each snippet/quote. Please notify me if any links are broken

BLOODBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASES: HIV/AIDS,HEPATITIS B, HEPATITIS C

– Exposures to blood and other body fluids occur across a wide variety of occupations. Health care workers, emergency response and public safety personnel, and other workers can be exposed to blood through needlestick and other sharps injuries, mucous membrane, and skin exposures. The pathogens of primary concern are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Workers and employers are urged to take advantage of available engineering controls and work practices to prevent exposure to blood and other body fluids. – http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/

List of Bloodborne Pathogens

Bloodborne illnesses are caused by microscopic pathogens. –

Bloodborne pathogens cause diseases through contact with blood. Since these diseases are present in an infected persons’ blood they are often present in other bodily fluids, so direct contact with blood is not always the only way to transmit them. Some bloodborne pathogens pose few significant health threats and some are potentially fatal, often by leading to other illnesses. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers extensive information about these pathogens.

– Read more: List of Bloodborne Pathogens | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6822351_list-bloodborne-pathogens.html#ixzz1r6vFNEtT

  • Hepatitis B – Hepatitis B attacks the liver. It can cause fatal liver conditions like cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. The CDC estimates that 3,000 people die each year from Hepatitis B related illness in the United States. Hepatitis B is commonly transmitted among drug users through shared needles and can be transmitted through any blood contact that involves a puncture of the skin or mucosal contact with other infectious body fluids.
  • Hepatitis C – The CDC lists Hepatitis C as the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States. Hepatitis C is transmitted most efficiently through direct blood contact involving a skin puncture. Transmission through sex or contact with other bodily fluids is possible but uncommon. As with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C can result in chronic, fatal liver diseases. The CDC estimates that four times as many people die from Hepatitis C related illnesses than from Hepatitis B.
  • HIV – Human immunodeficiency virus causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS weakens the immune system making it difficult for infected persons to resister other illnesses. AIDS is a late stage of the HIV viral infection and HIV medications can stave off the onset of AIDS for years or even decades. HIV is transmitted through unprotected sexual activity but can also be contracted through direct blood contact though skin punctures or to mucus membranes. The CDC recorded over 14,000 HIV related deaths in 2007.
  • Viral Hemorrhagic Fever – Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) refers to a group of illnesses that affect multiple organ systems. Bleeding, or hemorrhaging can be a major symptom of these diseases. The CDC has a Special Pathogens Branch that deals with the most sever VHFs. Insects and rodents are known hosts of VHFs but the hosts of some VHFs are unknown. Ebola and Marburg are two of the most well-known and dangerous VHFs. CDC records of Ebola and Marburg outbreaks indicate that the viruses most commonly occur in a few African countries and are often fatal. VHFs can be transmitted through blood and other bodily fluids but the fluids do not have to enter the skin through a puncture to cause infection.

Animal Blood – Safety of Pig vs. Cow blood (contributed by Orb)

Though the possibility of becoming ill from Pork blood is small, why risk it at all? It has nothing to do with pathogens, but instead with parasites. Trichinosis is a gastrointestinal illness caused by the intestinal roundworm, Trichinella spiralis. Trichinosis is prevented by cooking all pork and pork products at a temperature and for a sufficient amount of time to allow all parts to reach 71° C.

The eggs of this parasite can be found in a certain percentage of all pigs raised for dietary uses … which is why everyone always tells you to be certain to cook pork thoroughly before eating. It can also be found in the blood of the animal. Unfortunately, heating the blood to the suggested 71° C essentially destroys it, as far as it being “fresh” any longer, though you can make a nice blood pudding from it (I hear, I don’t do cooked blood).

In the infective stages, trichinosis causes intestinal ailments, nausea, vomiting, and watery stools. Later symptoms are facial swelling, headache, and delirium. Some people recovering from trichinosis suffer permanent heart or eye damage, and about 5 percent of cases are fatal. Trichinosis may be successfully treated with drugs before the blood migration phase (which is when the parasite eggs enter the blood stream of the host before attaching themselves to muscle fibers and forming cysts), but it is difficult to diagnose in the early stages. This disease is difficult to see in dietary pigs, and therefore a good deal of pork is sold that is infected. If you buy blood from a butcher, your chances of getting infected blood are higher, as it does not come from a major plant with FDA inspectors on site. The inspection system for small butcher shops is significantly different from that of major plants (more lax). Therefore, anytime you purchase ANY meat or blood product from a butcher you take a risk of some sort. Good reason to know your butcher well.

Beef blood is significantly safer as there are very few diseases or parasites that can be exchanged between humans and cows (mad cow disease being the only one I know of really – it being of little consequence here in the US).

Besides, I happen to like the taste of beef blood better than pig anyway.

http://www.drinkdeeplyanddream.com/realvampire/animal-blood.html

Other Risks of Blood-drinking

Besides the obvious (I hope) risk of becoming infected with a Blood-Borne Disease there are other risks involved, both mental and physical, to your and your donor that you definitely should be aware of. Those wishing to be “turned” especially should take note of these two pages.

To get the blood you need there are pretty much only three ways to do so: Cut another human being (donor), via menstruated blood, or via blood from a slaughter house. And the physical risks vary with each as well.

The common factor being there is no way to procure and drink blood that is completely risk-free. What goes for sex applies here to, the only true safety is to abstain. But, that aside, what are the risks behind each one?

Warning! The information below is not pretty nor glamorous, and I would not recommend eating anything while reading. It is, however, the truth which you as drinker, donor, or interested party should very much be aware of.

Click to read more: http://sarasvati.sanguinarius.org/oblbrsk.htm

Risks of blood-consumption and of blood-letting:

– Scarring

– Infection

– Blood loss

– HIV (AIDs)

– Hepatitis B & C

– VHF

– Salmonella or E. Coli (infected/undercooked meat and blood)

– trichinosis

– Brucellosis

– and many more..

 

A friend of mine years ago, “SpikeJonez” left me with this lovely little tale:

..then there were these other fellers. These guys come into the store, one of them kinda barrel-shaped and ruddy, wearing a Confederate flag t-shirt, boots, jacket and cowboy hat, the other being a beetle-like skinny guy with a pockmarked and skeletal face wearing a black trenchcoat and some metal t-shirt and jeans.

They come in and I roll out the patter of all of the things we have in the store, and when I get to “knives” they both practically leapt at the knife counter. I then proceed to demonstrate the various knives, and I’m noticing that they both have a peculiar tic, sort of weaving their heads occasionally and jerking it back into place.

They also had strange movements in other parts of their bodies, which I came to notice, too. I was used to seeing drunks and tweekers come in here and knew what their various drug-induced convulsions looked like, and this wasn’t it. Yet it looked kinda familiar, and I struggled to place it.

As the conversation goes on, I begin to suss out that these fellas think they are vampires, and they keep making thinly-veiled allusions to murdering people.

Now, New Orleans is swamp country, and there’s no better place to dispose of a body than in a gator-filled swamp, so I’d met my fair share of murderers down there. You can just tell the type of guy who could kill without compunction. I could tell that these guys were the type who could never kill a man, but I could also tell that they were the type to kill something.

Soon enough, the conversation moved on to blood, and at this point I just join in, unlike my usual quiet smiles when faced with such conversations. I mentioned that good blood is hard to find. The big guy looks over to the little guy and says “Not if you know where to find it,” and grinned a jack-o’-lantern grin, to which his cohort responded by oinking.

That’s when I realized what the deal was with the twitching. These guys had trichinosis. Yep, little worms were happily burrowing around in their brains driving them slowly insane, all because they drank infected pig’s blood. Hell, for all I know they got it from a rare porkchop at some backwoods roadside barbecue, but I like to think that it was their unsafe feeding habits that got them in the end. Remember kiddies, think before you drink!

Fae, a General Overview

Original piece created ~January 12, 2015. Some modifications have been done since then.

This is intended as an overview of mythology, commonly held beliefs and facts. –

The term Fae tends to be a bit of a broad term. Here I will try to simplify the complexity as best I can.

*Please keep in mind that accurate information may vary from person to person and from resource to resource.

When most people hear “Fae” they think, Fairy, right?

Well what are Fae really?

First, let us define Fae.

According to Wikipedia:

Fae, is simply another term for Fairy.

A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.)[1] is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural.

 

Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature. – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy

According to MythicalCreaturesGuide.com:

In the English Language fey means otherworldly, able to see the future, or touched in the head.http://www.mythicalcreaturesguide.com/page/Fae

It can be gathered that while Fairies are Fae, not all Fae are Fairies. Fae tend to be very nature-oriented creatures, having a parallel existence in this, our physical world, and in a “magickal” (Subtle/Non-physical) Plane.

– While commonly thought to be mischievous and playful (primarily Fairies), this is not the case for all.

Fae Types

Some entities that may fall under the term “Fae” are (but not limited to):

List includes kin-types & mythical creatures

Fairies

Angels

Elves

Nymphs

Pixies

*Succubi

Elementals

Gnomes

Ogres

Giants

Mer-folk

Genies (Jinn)

Dryads

*Succubus suggested as Fae type via pop-culture. See SyFy series Lost Girl ( http://www.showcase.ca/lostgirl/ )

_________________________________

Fae Courts

Fae, like other creatures, are often categorized as Dark, Light, or Neutral. For Fae, this puts them into specifically termed Courts.

Major Courts are:

Seelie (Light)

Unseelie (Dark)

Some believe in breaking down the courts further*:

Winter

Summer

Spring

Autumn

(reference: http://forum.otherkinalliance.org/index.php?topic=2343.0 – OtherkinAlliance – The Summer & Winter Courts by “Verde”) Otherkin Alliance forum has been down since 2013

*This is a new concept to me, personally. More information or better explanation to come as more information becomes available.

Further Information on Courts & Classifications:

_______________________________

Fae Groups

Social Order

Fae are either “Trooping” or “Solitary” creatures. Often communities are overseen by a King and Queen.

_______________________________

Fae as Otherkin

Fae-Kin for short.

Fae-kin are simply humans, identifying as otherkin (People who feel that they are in some way not entirely human), who believe their kin-type to be of a Fae variety.

____________________________________

Fae FAQ

Ask questions to see them posted here…

_____________________________________

References & Additional Resources about/for/by Fae

s i d h e, f a e r y, a n d t u a t h a ( a n d a l s o s o m e e l v e s )

Faeriepedia

Faeries, Fallen Angels, Demons and other related stuff

Mythical Creatures Guide, Fae

The Realm of Fae

http://main.otherkinalliance.org/articles/specific-otherkin/the-seven-roads-to-faery/

http://main.otherkinalliance.org/articles/specific-otherkin/elf-my-past/

http://main.otherkinalliance.org/articles/specific-otherkin/kabouters/

ImmortalOnes.com – Fae, Elven & Mer Folk

http://forum.otherkinalliance.org/index.php?board=13.0 – OtherkinAlliance.org Forum section Elementals, Elves & Fae (must join to view)

AngelFire.com – Who are The Fae?

Constructed Mythology Wikia – The Fae

http://forum.otherkinalliance.org/index.php?topic=429.0 – OtherkinAlliance – On The Fae, by “airforcegrrl”  Otherkin Alliance forum has been down since 2013

THE FAERIE KINGDOM – dnd.wizards.com

Classifications of fairies – Wikipedia

dresdenfiles.wikia – Faerie Courts

 

!-Please do not copy or use without first either ASKING permission or at least giving credit to the author, Myself Amelia Nightside -!

*OtherkinAlliance.org down indefinitely. New sources/references needed. Please do feel free to comment on this piece and help me out with your own understanding and preferred resources. (:

Medical Symptoms Possibly Confused as Vampirism

This article was written by my friend, “SpikeJonez”. I take NO credit for it and request that NO ONE repost or reuse this article without written expressed permission. Shares with a direct link back to this are permitted.

Absolutely NO part of this article has been changed from it’s original creation (except where specified).

Symptoms that may be confused as [real] Vampirism

SYMPTOMS CHECKLIST FOR OTHER DISEASES:

“Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.” ~Carl Sagan

Vampirism is an extraordinary condition. The symptoms that one has when affected by it are rather extraordinary to find together. When you are a vampire and you go through your awakening the symptoms can be sometimes rather severe, and seem to be other illnesses. However those illnesses have a different set of symptoms than the ones that will be present, and if you are properly tested for this illnesses, you will come out negative.

Conversely, there are a few diseases out there that have symptoms that are easily confused for the symptoms of vampirism. Here are a few of them, and I’ll be adding more ailments as well as their symptoms later:

Dehydration

Symptoms of Dehydration

  • Dry mouth
  • Dry tongue
  • Fatigue
  • Dark colored urine
  • Infrequent urination
  • Reduced urine
  • Dry skin
  • Loose skin
  • Wrinkled skin
  • Rapid pulse
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle cramps
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sunken eyes
  • Light-headedness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of consciousness
  • From Wrong Diagnosis.

 

Rickets

Signs and symptoms of rickets include:

  • Bone pain or tenderness
  • dental problems
  • muscle weakness (rickety myopathy or “floppy baby syndrome”)
  • increased tendency for fractures (easily broken bones), especially greenstick fractures
  • Skeletal deformity
  • Cranial, spinal, and pelvic deformities
  • Growth disturbance
  • Hypocalcaemia (low level of calcium in the blood), and
  • Tetany (uncontrolled muscle spasms all over the body).
  • Craniotabes (soft skull)
  • Costochondral swelling (aka “rickety rosary” or “rachitic rosary”)
  • Harrison’s groove
  • Double malleoli sign due to metaphyseal hyperplasia [1] An X-ray or radiograph of an advanced sufferer from rickets tends to present in a classic way: bow legs (outward curve of long bone of the legs) and a deformed chest. Changes in the skull also occur causing a distinctive “square headed” appearance. These deformities persist into adult life if not treated.
  • Long-term consequences include permanent bends or disfiguration of the long bones, and a curved back.

Iron Deficiency Anemia

Mild iron deficiency anemia may not cause noticeable symptoms. If anemia is severe, symptoms may include:

  • Weakness, fatigue, or lack of stamina.
  • Shortness of breath during exercise.
  • Headache.
  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Irritability.
  • Dizziness.
  • Pale skin.
  • Craving substances that are not food (pica). In particular, a craving for ice can be a sign of iron deficiency anemia.
  • Other signs may include:
    • Rapid heartbeat.
    • Brittle fingernails and toenails.
    • Cracked lips.
    • Smooth, sore tongue.

From WebMD.

Lead poisoning

The signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in children are nonspecific and may include:

  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Sluggishness
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Unusual pallor (paleness) from anemia
  • Learning difficulties
  • Signs and symptoms in adultsAlthough children are primarily at risk, lead poisoning is also dangerous to adults. Signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in adults may include:
    • Pain, numbness or tingling of the extremities
    • Muscular weakness
    • Headache
    • Abdominal pain
    • Memory loss
    • Mood disorders
    • Reduced sperm count, abnormal spermAlso, lead poisoning can lead to pika*, the urge to eat inedible or unusual objects, such as more lead paint chips, or perhaps blood.
  • Taken from MayoClinic.com.*not taken from Mayo Clinic
  • Hypoglycemia
  • The first set of symptoms are called neuro-genic (or sympathetic) because they relate to the nervous system�s response to hypoglycemia. Patients may experience any of the following;
    • nervousness,
    • sweating,
    • intense hunger,
    • trembling,
    • weakness,
    • palpitations, and
    • often have trouble speaking.
  • If a person does not or cannot respond by eating something to raise blood glucose, the levels of glucose continue to drop. Somewhere in the 45 mg/dl range, most patients progress to neuro-glyco-penic ranges (the brain is not getting enough glucose). At this point, symptoms progress to confusion, drowsiness, changes in behavior, coma and seizure.
  • From MedicineNet’s Hypoglycemia Information.

Diabetes

  • People who think they might have diabetes must visit a physician for diagnosis. They might have SOME or NONE of the following symptoms:
  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Extreme hunger
  • Sudden vision changes
  • Tingling or numbness in hands or feet
  • Feeling very tired much of the time
  • Very dry skin
  • Sores that are slow to heal
  • More infections than usual.
  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains may accompany some of these symptoms in the abrupt onset of insulin-dependent diabetes, now called type 1 diabetes.
  • From The Centers of Disease Control website.

Lupus

  • Common signs of lupus are:
    • Red rash or color change on the face, often in the shape of a butterfly across the nose and cheeks
    • Painful or swollen joints
    • Unexplained fever
    • Chest pain with deep breathing
    • Swollen glands
    • Extreme fatigue (feeling tired all the time)
    • Unusual hair loss (mainly on the scalp)
    • Pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress
    • Sensitivity to the sun
    • Low blood count
    • Depression, trouble thinking, and/or memory problems
    • Other signs are mouth sores, unexplained seizures (convulsions), �seeing things� (hallucinations), repeated miscarriages, and unexplained kidney problems.
  • From Do I Have Lupus?

Porphyria

  • When heme production is faulty, porphyrins are overproduced and lend a reddish-purple color to urine.
  • The cutaneous porphyrias cause sun sensitivity, with blistering typically on the face, back of the hands, and other sun-exposed areas. The most common of these is porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). Triggering factors are alcohol use, estrogen, iron, and liver disease, particularly hepatitis C.
  • The acute porphyrias typically cause abdominal pain and nausea. Some patients have personality changes and seizures at the outset. With time the illness can involve weakness in many different muscles.
  • Porphyria affects either the nervous system or the skin. When porphyria affects the nervous system, it can cause chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle cramps, weakness, hallucinations, seizures, purple-red-colored urine, or mental disorders like depression, anxiety, and paranoia. When porphyria affects the skin, blisters, itching, swelling, and sensitivity to the sun can result.
  • The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Porphyria includes the 29 symptoms listed below:
    • Urine color changes
    • Darkened urine
    • Nerve complication symptoms
      • Chest pain
      • Abdominal pain
      • Muscle cramps
      • Muscle weakness
      • Hallucinations
      • Seizures
      • Depression
      • Anxiety
      • Paranoia
      • High blood pressure
      • Rapid pulse
      • Fever
    • Skin complication symptoms
      • Skin blisters
      • Skin itching
      • Skin swelling
      • Sun sensitivity
      • Photosensitivity
      • Paresthesias
      • Hair growth abnormalities
      • Skin pigment changes
    • Gastrointestinal upset
      • Abdominal pain
      • Vomiting
      • Nausea
      • Constipation
  • The only way to be sure you have porphyria is through a series of tests that include:
    • Blood tests
    • Urine tests for porphyrins
    • Stool tests for porphyrins
  • From Wrong Diagnosis.

Xeroderma Pigmentosa

    • Symptoms:
    • A sunburn that does not heal following minimal sun exposure
    • Blistering following minimal sun exposure
    • Cutaneous telangiectasia [abnormal dilation of blood vessels near the surface of the skin]
    • Increasing irregular pigmentation of the skin
    • Crusting of the skin
    • Scaling of the skin
    • Oozing raw skin surface
    • Discomfort when exposed to bright light ( photophobia )
    • Neurologic changes are sometimes noted
  • From The University of Maryland Medical Center website.

Bipolar Disorder

  • Signs and symptoms of mania (or a manic episode) include:
    • Increased energy, activity, and restlessness
    • Excessively “high,” overly good, euphoric mood
    • Extreme irritability
    • Racing thoughts and talking very fast, jumping from one idea to another
    • Distractibility, can’t concentrate well
    • Little sleep needed
    • Unrealistic beliefs in one’s abilities and powers
    • Poor judgment
    • Spending sprees
    • A lasting period of behavior that is different from usual
    • Increased sexual drive
    • Abuse of drugs, particularly cocaine, alcohol, and sleeping medications
    • Provocative, intrusive, or aggressive behavior
    • Denial that anything is wrong
  • A manic episode is diagnosed if elevated mood occurs with three or more of the other symptoms most of the day, nearly every day, for 1 week or longer. If the mood is irritable, four additional symptoms must be present.
  • Signs and symptoms of depression (or a depressive episode) include:
    • Lasting sad, anxious, or empty mood
    • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
    • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
    • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed, including sex
    • Decreased energy, a feeling of fatigue or of being “slowed down”
    • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
    • Restlessness or irritability
    • Sleeping too much, or can’t sleep
    • Change in appetite and/or unintended weight loss or gain
    • Chronic pain or other persistent bodily symptoms that are not caused by physical illness or injury
    • Thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts
  • A depressive episode is diagnosed if five or more of these symptoms last most of the day, nearly every day, for a period of 2 weeks or longer.
  • A mild to moderate level of mania is called hypomania. Hypomania may feel good to the person who experiences it and may even be associated with good functioning and enhanced productivity. Thus even when family and friends learn to recognize the mood swings as possible bipolar disorder, the person may deny that anything is wrong. Without proper treatment, however, hypomania can become severe mania in some people or can switch into depression.
  • Sometimes, severe episodes of mania or depression include symptoms of psychosis (or psychotic symptoms). Common psychotic symptoms are hallucinations (hearing, seeing, or otherwise sensing the presence of things not actually there) and delusions (false, strongly held beliefs not influenced by logical reasoning or explained by a person’s usual cultural concepts). Psychotic symptoms in bipolar disorder tend to reflect the extreme mood state at the time. For example, delusions of grandiosity, such as believing one is the President or has special powers or wealth, may occur during mania; delusions of guilt or worthlessness, such as believing that one is ruined and penniless or has committed some terrible crime, may appear during depression. People with bipolar disorder who have these symptoms are sometimes incorrectly diagnosed as having schizophrenia, another severe mental illness.
  • From The National Institute of Mental Health website.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder

  • Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder include:
    • Incorrect interpretation of events, including feeling that external events have personal meaning
    • Peculiar thinking, beliefs or behavior
    • Belief in special powers, such as telepathy
    • Perceptual alterations, in some cases bodily illusions, including “phantom pains” or other distortions in the sense of touch
    • Idiosyncratic speech, such as loose or vague patterns of speaking or tendency to go off on tangents
    • Suspicious or paranoid ideas
    • Flat emotions or inappropriate emotional responses
    • Lack of close friends outside of the immediate family
    • Persistent and excessive social anxiety that doesn’t abate with time
  • Schizotypal personality disorder can easily be confused with schizophrenia, which is characterized by intense psychosis, a severe mental state characterized by a loss of contact with reality. While schizotypal personalities may experience brief psychotic episodes with delusions or hallucinations, they are not as pronounced, frequent or intense as in schizophrenia.
  • Both disorders, along with schizoid personality disorder, belong to what’s generally referred to as the “schizophrenic spectrum.” Schizotypal personality falls in the middle of the spectrum, with schizoid personality disorder on the milder end and schizophrenia on the more severe end.
  • From MayoClinic.com.

And last, but by no means least:

Hypochondria

Symptoms of hypochondria include, but are not limited to:

  • If you think you have most, if not everything listed above.

Links/References:

 

*7/30/15 – minor edits have been made and conditions added by myself, Amelia Nightside

 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) is a condition in which your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough of certain important hormones

It seldom causes symptoms in the early stages, but, over time, untreated hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease. – http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/basics/definition/con-20021179

Symptoms include (but may not be limited to):

  • Fatigue
  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Constipation or IBS related symptoms
  • Acid Reflux
  • Dry, rough pale skin
  • Dry/Brittle fingernails and toenails
  • Unexplained Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
  • Puffy face
  • Hoarseness
  • Muscle weakness
  • Elevated blood cholesterol level
  • Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
  • Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
  • Heavier than normal or irregular menstrual periods
  • Thinning hair
  • Coarse, dry hair
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Depression or mood swings
  • Impaired memory
  • Irritability
  • Swelling of the thyroid gland (goiter)
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

(Some symptoms presented in Infants, Children and Teens may vary as compared to symptoms in adults, please see the following link for more: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/basics/symptoms/con-20021179 )

Additional [re]sources used:

General Resources

Modifications to be on-going (as best as I am able).

Please comment and share your resources. Those you comment may or may not be added to this list per MY discretion.
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If any links appear broken, please say something.

Information Covered:
O = Otherkin (Unicorns, Draconity, Fictionkin, Objectkin, etc. possibly included), T = Therian, V = Vampirism (Medical Sanguinarians possibly included), MS = Medical Sanguinarian (Med. Sang.)/Sanguivore specific, D = Donor specific resources (in reference to Vampires & Sanguinarians) + = more/other

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